The most orgasms occur in relationships in which no males are involved

Women in same sex relationships experience the greatest frequency of multiple orgasms. They are #1. The most orgasms occur in relationships in which no males are involved.

After them, the greatest frequency of orgasms is experienced by men in opposite-sex relationships, women in opposite-sex relationships, & men in same-sex relationships.

Taken together, women in same-sex relationships have the best sex lives (Blair & Pukall, 2014; Frederick et al., 2017; Garcia et al., 2014),

“and may offer ideal sexual scripts that individuals in other relationship types may benefit from adopting” (Blair et al., 2018).

“The clitoris is the primary sensory source for triggering orgasms in women (Mah & Binik, 2001). While the clitoris can occasionally be stimulated during penetrative vaginal intercourse (either directly or indirectly), the majority of women indicate that they do not usually orgasm from penetration alone (Lloyd, 2005).

Women reported this again in a 2019 study (Andrejek & Fetner, 2019). Men helped that time.

Compared to other sexual activities during which the clitoris is directly stimulated (e.g., manual–genital or oral–genital simulation),

women are least likely to experience orgasm during penile–vaginal intercourse (e.g., Kinsey, et al., 1953; Laumann et al., 1994).

While the majority of men indicate that they usually or always orgasm during penile–vaginal intercourse (Janus & Janus, 1993), the majority of women indicate that they usually do not orgasm as a result of vaginal penetration (Lloyd, 2005). Women report that they are more likely to experience orgasm during nonpenetrative partnered activities, specifically those that directly stimulate the clitoris. For example, Fugl-Meyer et al.(2006) found that 83% of their female sample reported orgasms from manual genital caressing and 69% reported orgasm from receiving oral sex.

Women reported more pleasure from manual–genital stimulation by a partner than did men (Pinkerton et al., 2003). Women have also reported a greater preference for more tender (e.g., hugging, talking), sensual (e.g., kissing, having breasts stimulated by partner), or erotic (e.g., dancing or undressing for a partner) sexual activities than men (Holmberg & Blair, 2009).

Penile penetration (i.e., vaginal and/or anal penetration) occurs less often in men’s same-sex sexual activity than it does in mixed-sex sexual activity (de Visser, et al., 2003; Grulich et al., 2003; Laumann et al., 1994). Multiple studies have found that anal sex is practiced less often than mutual masturbation and oral sex (both giving and receiving) in male same-sex relationships (Rosenberger et al., 2011).

Lesbians engage in manual stimulation of the genitals (either inside the vagina or externally on the vulva), oral sex, and rubbing genitals together (Bailey et al., 2003; Schick et al., 2012). Given that men are more likely to orgasm from penetrative activities, while women are more likely to experience orgasm from clitoral stimulation, one might hypothesize that women engaging in same-sex sexual activity would experience more orgasms than heterosexual women, whereas men engaging in same-sex sexual activity might experience fewer orgasms than heterosexual men. Indeed, research has long suggested that women in same-sex relationships experience frequent and intense orgasms (Kinsey et al., 1953), perhaps to a greater extent than heterosexual women (Bressler & Lavender, 1986).

While men in same-sex relationships experience enjoyable sex and frequent orgasms (Rosenberger et al., 2011), it appears that orgasm may occur less frequently in their partnered sexual activities than it does for men in mixed-sex relationships (e.g., Grulich et al., 2003; Richters et al., 2006).”

Zhang et al., 2021: “…men should initiate sex, be sexually experienced as well as sexually skilled, always be prepared for sex, and responsible for a woman’s orgasm (Bowleg et al., 2004; Dworkin & O’Sullivan, 2005; Hawton, 1986; Seal & Ehrhardt, 2003; Vannier & O’Sullivan, 2011; Wiederman, 2005). In contrast, women’s sexual scripts are described as the “gatekeeper,” and they should serve or please men (Vannier & O’Sullivan, 2011; Weinberg et al., 2010). Also, women are expected to limit their sexual desire and not to talk about their sexual pleasure (McCabe et al., 2010).

The sexual double standard from this traditional sexual script reinforces gender stratification and perpetuates women’s sexuality in social control (Wiederman, 2005). However, couples may enact very different gender scripts for sexuality rather than follow cultural norms. Accumulative evidence has indicated that heterosexual scripts are changing, gender inequity is decreasing in the sexual realm (Masters et al., 2013), and couples are becoming more egalitarian in sex initiation (Dworkin & O’Sullivan, 2005; Masters et al., 2013).”

“Orgasm Results of the 2018 National Survey on Sexual Health and Behavior showed that 68% of Black women experienced an orgasm during their most recent sexual experience (Townes and Herbenick, 2020). Although this percentage is high an orgasm gap between Black men and women exists. Society teaches Black men to openly desire and seek pleasure, while Black women may struggle with achieving orgasm due to societal sexual repression (Staf, 2019). If a woman experiences orgasms with her partner frequently and consistently, it may indicate egalitarian sex roles within their relationship, that she has knowledge of her body, and is comfortable communicating her needs to her partner and prioritizing her pleasure (Pearson, 2018).

Black women are the most religious group of people in the United States; therefore, their partner’s religiosity may impact their spiritual intimacy (shared thoughts and feelings about religion) (Bagarozzi 2014) as well as sexual intimacy and outcomes. Older partners also tend to have more power in relationships (Seal et al. 2008). Large age differences in Black heterosexual couples are associated with male-initiated sex versus female-initiated sex (Seal et al. 2008).”

Sidenotes (assume direct quotes)

Rodriguez et al. (2021)

Regarding female ejaculation… “Some of the confusion in the literature could in part be attributable to analyses of two different fluids arising from separate structures and processes. Pastor (2013) and Pastor and Chmel (2018) identified and distinguished the female fluids expelled during coitus. It is clear that most vaginal secretions function as lubricants, but misconceptions regarding female ejaculate are rampant. Pastor and Chmel (2018) drew attention to the fact that many individuals refer to any fluid expressed from the vagina or urethra during coitus as female ejaculate, which leads to significant confusion in the literature. For example, female ejaculate is biochemically and physiologically different from squirting fluids or urine from coital incontinence (Pastor & Chmel, 2018). The study found that squirting, or gushing, refers to a large, involuntary expulsion of clear, watery fluid during coitus, while female ejaculation yields a milky substance. Both fluids are expelled through the urethra but do not originate from the same structures.

Squirting culminates in gushes of fluid, ranging in volume from 15 to 110 ml, that are biochemically identical to urine (Salama et al., 2015; Wimpissinger, Springer, & Stackl, 2013). This fluid can be released by stimulation of the Gräfenberg spot (anterior vaginal wall clitoro-urethro-vaginal complex) (Pastor & Chmel, 2018; Rubio-Casillas & Jannini, 2011; Salama et al., 2015) and is reported as a positive response to a sexual encounter between partners (Wimpissinger et al., 2013). In contrast, female ejaculate consists of a small volume of secretion from Skene’s glands (Pastor & Chmel, 2018), which is also attributed to orgasm (Wimpissinger et al., 2007) but is less evident than squirting fluids. The fluid is biochemically different from urine as it contains high concentrations of prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostatic-specific acid phosphatase, fructose, and glucose (Pastor & Chmel, 2018; Wimpissinger et al., 2007; Zaviacic, Dolezalova et al., 1988).

Biochemical and anatomical investigations suggest that female ejaculation is a real phenomenon, as opposed to an illusion, as some researchers suggest. Some studies suggest that the fluid expelled during ejaculation is actually urine and not the product of urethral glands. However, recent data regarding the chemical composition of the ejaculate distinguish it biochemically from urine. Concentrations of compounds such as creatinine, urea, uric acid, PSA, and prostate acid phosphatase differ completely between female ejaculate and urine (Gilliland, 2009; O’Connell, Eizenberg, Rahman, & Cleeve, 2008; Pastor, 2013; Wimpissinger et al., 2007). Most relevant is the presence of PSA. Clinically, elevated levels of PSA are used as a marker of prostate pathology in males (Korda et al., 2010; Wimpissinger et al., 2007). Wimpissinger et al. (2007) showed that PSA was present in intraurethral gland secretions from two female subjects. The PSA levels in the ejaculate were 213.49 ng/ml and 105.9 ng/ml in female subjects 1 and 2, while the levels in their urine were 0.80 ng/ml and 0.16 ng/ml, respectively (Wimpissinger et al., 2007). A recent study by Pastor and Chmel (2018) yielded similar results and further demonstrated the differences between the two fluids.

Perhaps the dismissal of female ejaculation as a real phenomenon has resulted from the scientific evaluation of squirting or lubricating fluids instead of true female ejaculate. Despite the increased evidence supporting female ejaculation, the fluid’s function remains a subject of debate; however, some speculate that it confers antimicrobial protection against postcoital urinary tract infections (Moalem & Reidenberg, 2009).”

Rodriguez, F. D., Camacho, A., Bordes, S. J., Gardner, B., Levin, R. J., & Tubbs, R. S. (2021). Female ejaculation: An update on anatomy, history, and controversies. Clinical Anatomy, 34(1), 103–107.

Oxytocin is a hormone in the bloodstream & a neurotransmitter in the brain.

Acute oxytocin release induces many behavioral changes; it is the specific neurotransmitter of love, sexual pleasure, orgasm, bonding, empathy, attachment, and motherhood (Sayin, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2017-b,c , 2018-a, 2019; Kuchinska, 2009; Carter, 1992; Lee, 2009; Magon, 2011; Kim, 2015).

The anterior cingulate and insula are activated at orgasms, but they can also be activated by painful stimuli (Pukall, 2005; Casey, 1994, 2001). There is a possibility that pain and orgasm may be using similar or the same spinothalamic pathways,

a neurophysiological mechanism which can explain why some women and men enjoy mild pain and pleasure/orgasm together in BDSM sessions.

The female orgasm is analgesic (Whipple, 1985; Steinman, 1983; Komisaruk, 2006), probably due to the release of oxytocin, which has also analgesic effects, and endogenous opioids. This can also explain how mild pain and orgasmic pleasure can be interchangeable with each other.

Status orgasmus was first coined by Masters & Johnson after observing a female, who had experienced an orgasm lasting for 43 seconds (Masters & Johnson, 1966).

Normally, it is reported that temporal lobe epilepsy generally induces hypo-sexuality (Demerdash, 1991).

“Oxytocin modulates inflammation by decreasing certain cytokines. Thus, the increased release of OXT via orgasm has the potential to hasten wound healing. Sexual arousal and orgasms increase the absolute number of natural killer cells & leukocytes in peripheral blood, which helps boost the immune system.” — Samantha Tojino

an anti-inflammatory effect due to OXT reducing inflammation, thus allowing the wound to heal more quickly.”

Home Court Advantage & Superbowl Babies

¨A well‐studied example of neural changes with social information is the “winner effect,” where physiology and gene expression change, after a social contest, in the brains of both the victor and the vanquished. In many vertebrates, winning an aggressive encounter induces a surge in circulating androgens (Archer, 2006; Goymann, 2009; Hirschenhauser & Oliveira, 2006; Oliveira, 2004; Wingfield, Hegner, Dufty, & Ball et al., 2010) which in turn increases the probability of winning future encounters (Dugatkin, 1997; Hsu, Earley, & Wolf, 2006; Hsu & Wolf, 1999; Rutte, Taborsky, & Brinkhof, 2006). In the male California mouse (Peromyscus californicus), winners of a conflict will respond with a rise in circulating testosterone that is accompanied by an increase in androgen receptor expression in brain regions associated with aggression (Fuxjager et al., 2010).

Furthermore, the androgen response to victory is more pronounced when home than in an unfamiliar environment.

This context‐dependent social experience is translated in the brain by increasing androgen receptor expression in regions that modulate reward processing when the fight is won in the home cage but not in an unfamiliar location (Fuxjager et al., 2010). This neural plasticity to social interactions may serve to increase future winning ability by preparing the animal for future encounters in a context‐dependent manner.”

False Identity dalam Media Online Dating (Catfishing Media Online Dating Tinder)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.34007/jehss.v3i3.493

Rifai Septian Nurdin(1*)

Abstract

This study aims to determine the process of a person’s interaction on Tinder social media, causing a new phenomenon known as catfishing. This research uses a qualitative approach. The data collection technique was obtained by using in-depth interview techniques. The results of the study show that the self-presentations displayed by Tinder users are not using their real photos or identities. The scope of self-presentation shown in this study does not extend to false identity or paint through identity theft. Tinder users in this study tended to use their original photos that they had edited to look better and closer to the ideal Tinder users liked, use their old photos that were considered better and closer to ideal, blur their original photos, use their real photos but not using real names, to using photos of objects or objects that interest them to show their interests and hobbies to other users. In this study, there were no users who used other people’s existing identities either by using other people’s photos or identities that showed someone who was in real life

Glad You Came: The History of the Science Concerning the Study of the Female Orgasm

Eva Clark-Lepard & Alex James Wilson (2016)

I'm passionate about making a tangible difference in the lives of others, & that's something I have the opportunity to do a professor & researcher.